Must Read

Immigrant Small Business Owners: A Significant and Growing Part of the Economy

June 14, 2012. More than one in six small business owners in the United States is an immigrant, according to a new report from FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative. Immigrants – people born in another country – make up 18 percent of all small business owners in the United States. By contrast, immigrants are 13 percent of the population and 16 percent of the labor force, according to the American Community Survey from 2010. That’s a big change from 20 years … (read more)

Fact vs. Fiction on Raising New York’s Minimum Wage

May 21, 2012. Last week, following Assembly passage of legislation to increase New York’s minimum wage to $8.50 an hour, Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos argued that the minimum wage increase would harm minimum wage workers because they would pay more in taxes and some might lose eligibility for Family Health Plus. In this brief, The Fiscal Policy Institute and the National Employment Law Project review the facts and show that, on an after tax basis, all minimum wage … (read more)

Helping the Helpers Will Help Us All: The Economic Situation of New York City’s Health Care and Social Assistance Sector

May 7, 2012. A new report from FPI looks at the importance of jobs in the nonprofit health care and social assistance sector in New York City, and examines how the hardships facing the city’s low-income population – the main constituency served by the nonprofit human services sector – have grown in the wake of the Great Recession of 2008-2009 and the weak recovery over the past three years.

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Short Term Property Tax Relief and Long Term Tax Reform: An Omnibus Approach

March 1, 2011. At the public hearing on the Governor’s proposed “Cap on Real Property Taxes” before the Assembly Standing Committees on Ways and Means, Education, Real Property Taxation, Local Government and Cities, Frank Mauro, FPI’s executive director, explained why a cap on real property taxes would not effectively protect those most in need of property tax relief, and would exacerbate inequities in the current school finance system. In the short run, a property tax circuit breaker would provide effective … (read more)

New York Shouldn’t Look to Massachusetts as a Model for Property Tax Reform

May 25, 2010. With Governor Cuomo proposing a rigid cap on property taxes based on Massachusetts’ Proposition 2½, this 2010 update of a landmark report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities should be must reading for New York policymakers. This report describes the problems the cap has created in Massachusetts and explains why the impact could be even more severe in New York. Among the key lessons of the Massachusetts experience:

  • A tax cap won’t make government services
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