Elementary and secondary education

Comparison of the Executive, Assembly, and Senate Education Proposals FY 2015-2016

March 24, 2015. The governor’s Executive Budget proposal would increase school aid by $1.07 billion. The increase in school aid is contingent on passage of a package of changes to teacher evaluation, tenure, and other procedures called the Education Opportunity Agenda. The budget also includes an Education Tax Credit which would provide a large credit for donations to schools and the Dream Act which would provide tuition assistance to undocumented immigrants who came to the country as children. The Assembly’s… (read more)

Policy Brief: Schools and Poverty

March 17, 2015. The state can improve low-performing schools and help students who face learning barriers by increasing funding for key education programs and poverty-fighting efforts. Proposals by the governor and the legislature are a start, but still fall short of what is needed.

In a report issued in February, the state identified 178 schools in 17 school districts as “priority” or “failing” schools. These schools score in the bottom 5 percent in student proficiency tests or have low graduation… (read more)

Policy Brief: Education Tax Credit

March 2, 2015. The Executive Budget includes an Education Tax Credit (ETC) that would provide individuals and businesses with a substantial credit against income taxes owed for donations to private and public schools, or scholarship organizations. The governor’s legislation proposes a 75 percent credit rate, with individual credit amounts capped at $1 million. Any unused credit could be carried over to a subsequent year. Both businesses and individuals would be eligible to receive the credit on personal or corporate income… (read more)

Testimony at the New York City Council Education and Women’s Issues Committees

February 11, 2014. James Parrott testified before the New York City Council Education and Women’s Issues Committees on Feb. 11, 2014, on the subject of Mayor deBlasio’s Universal Pre-Kindergarten and After-School Proposals. Parrott supported the notion that there should be a dedicated funding stream to pay for these proposals financed by an increase in the top rate on the City’s personal income tax. He examined the proposed increase in historical perspective, reviewed the issue of migration in response to… (read more)

Major education organizations release analysis showing 64 percent of school districts face cuts in excess of $15,000 per classroom

February 22, 2009. The Fiscal Policy Institute joined with the Alliance for Quality Education and other groups to publicize the grim truth about Governor Paterson’s $2.5 billion in school aid cuts. Nearly two thirds of school districts face cuts in excess of $15,000 per classroom, and sixty districts face cuts over $30,000 per classroom. Education committee chairwomen Assemblywoman Nolan and Senator Oppenheimer joined education advocates in calling for school aid restorations; the organizations called for fair share tax reform.… (read more)

School Finance On Long Island: An Analysis of State and Local Funding Patterns

January 30, 2009. FPI researched and wrote this paper for the Rauch Foundation as a supplemental report to Long Island Index 2009, a study of how Long Island is faring as a region. The index includes reports on specific indicators selected to reflect region-wide impact and interests, and identifies emerging trends and gaps that should be addressed now to avoid future problems. FPI was also cited widely in another section of the Index, Long Island’s Educational(read more)

Will Education Funding Promises be Broken?

February 14, 2008. FPI prepared the data for this report this report from the Alliance for Quality Education – showing that the proposed cuts in foundation aid in the executive budget disproportionately hurt students from poor households. The districts outside of New York City with the highest proportion of poverty (districts in which, on average, 60 percent of students live in poverty) face 20 percent of the proposed cuts despite having only 15 percent of all students in… (read more)

Property Taxes on Long Island: Zeroing in on the Problems and Solutions

October 15, 2007. This report takes a fresh look at the property tax “crisis” and finds that: flawed evaluations have resulted in flawed solutions, taxpayers in poorer districts struggle the most, and voters in wealthy districts choose to pay for high quality schools while voters in poorer districts have a much higher rate of rejecting school budgets. Two oft-touted reforms have a negative impact on local control and school equity; circuit breaker reform in contrast can be well targeted… (read more)

Pre-K Investment Yields Bonuses for Children, Families, Communities and State and Federal Government

May 3, 2007. A new study from the Economic Policy Institute, Enriching Children, Enriching the Nation, was co-released in New York by FPI and Winning Beginning New York. The question asked is whether pre-K pays for itself – and the answer is remarkable. Pre-K pays for itself not once, not twice, but 12 times over! New York press release >>

How to Reduce the Pressure on the Property Tax and Ease the Fiscal Burden on Struggling Local Governments

January 10, 2007. The four-part plan supported by FPI: implement a statewide solution to CFE; increase state’s share of Medicaid and base counties’ shares on ability to pay; restore commitment to revenue sharing; and eliminate the significant disparities in the STAR program. Prepared for the Center on Governmental Research conference on reforming property taxes in New York.