Elementary and secondary education

How to Reduce the Pressure on the Property Tax and Ease the Fiscal Burden on Struggling Local Governments

January 10, 2007. The four-part plan supported by FPI: implement a statewide solution to CFE; increase state’s share of Medicaid and base counties’ shares on ability to pay; restore commitment to revenue sharing; and eliminate the significant disparities in the STAR program. Prepared for the Center on Governmental Research conference on reforming property taxes in New York.… (read more)

New York State’s Dual Crises: Low Graduation Rates and Rising School Taxes

May 18, 2006. A new report issued by the Public Policy and Education Fund of New York with the assistance of the Fiscal Policy Institute.… (read more)

Balancing New York State’s 2006-2007 Budget in an Economically Sensible Manner

January 31, 2006. The Fiscal Policy Institute’s analysis of Governor George E. Pataki’s Executive Budget and alternative approaches to balancing New York State’s 2006-2007 budget. (See pages 28, 29 and 42 through 57 for analysis of school funding issues.) Briefing book on the 2006-2007 executive budget >>(read more)

Fair Taxes: The Key to Better Schools

Fall 2005. A training curriculum prepared by the Public Policy and Education Fund of New York and the Fiscal Policy Institute.… (read more)

New National Report Offers Sobering Look at Trends in New York’s Early Childhood Education Workforce

September 15, 2005. This issue of Fiscal Policy Note$ takes a look at a comprehensive new report, Losing Ground in Early Childhood Education, from the Economic Policy Institute, the Keystone Research Center, and the Foundation for Child Development. Among the findings: qualifications decline among early childhood education workers with less one fourth now having college degrees. Since the early 1980s, there has been a large and unsettling dip in the qualifications of the early childhood education workers in New … (read more)

Funding a Sound Basic Education for All New York’s Children

June 2005. This issue brief is an updated and condensed version of FPI’s original January 1999 report on this subject. The update is based on: the Campaign for Fiscal Equity’s Schools for New York’s Future Act, FPI’s analysis of the fiscal implications of that proposal, and the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy’s April 2005 report, Achieving Adequacy: Tax Options for New York in the Wake of the CFE Case. Read the brief >>(read more)

Simulations of the fiscal impact of the Schools for New York’s Future Act

March 25, 2005. District by district impact of the Schools for New York’s Future Act, prepared by FPI for the Campaign for Fiscal Equity.… (read more)

Balancing New York State’s 2005-2006 Budget in an Economically Sensible Manner

January 25, 2005. The Fiscal Policy Institute’s briefing on Governor George E. Pataki’s Executive Budget and alternative approaches to balancing New York State’s 2005-2006 budget.

See pages 16 through 24 for FPI’s analysis of the economic impact of the Legislature’s 2003 decisions to add two temporary top rates to the state income tax and avoid deep cuts in aid to public schools. See pages 33 through 37 for FPI’s analysis of the Governor’s school aid proposals for 2005-2006.

Briefing book (read more)

Calculating the Cost of a Sound Basic Education

November 17, 2004. A supplemental affidavit submitted by FPI to the three court-appointed referees in the landmark school funding adequacy case (Campaign for Fiscal Equity vs. New York State). This supplemental affidavit and an earlier October 26, 2004 affidavit were prepared in response to questions from the referees regarding regional cost indices, the state government’s “cost effectiveness” filter and weightings for poverty and other special needs. In these affidavits, Mauro responds to questions from the referees regarding regional cost indices, … (read more)

Early Investment in Kids = Huge Payoff to Taxpayers

October 19, 2004. New York press release:

A new study being released today by the Economic Policy Institute finds that increased federal and state investments in comprehensive high quality early childhood development programs would more than pay for themselves – generating more than $2 in returns to taxpayers for every $1 invested. The overall economic benefits would be even greater – more than $8 in benefits to society for each $1 invested.

The report, Exceptional Returns: Economic, Fiscal, and Social (read more)