Elementary and secondary education

Early Investment in Kids = Huge Payoff to Taxpayers

October 19, 2004. New York press release:

A new study being released today by the Economic Policy Institute finds that increased federal and state investments in comprehensive high quality early childhood development programs would more than pay for themselves – generating more than $2 in returns to taxpayers for every $1 invested. The overall economic benefits would be even greater – more than $8 in benefits to society for each $1 invested.

The report, Exceptional Returns: Economic, Fiscal, and Social (read more)

No Funding, No Fairness: The State of Our Schools in 2004

October 4, 2004. This new report by the Public Policy and Education Fund (PPEF) shows that little if any progress was made in 2004 and 2005 with respect toward one of the most critical issues facing New York’s educational system: the failure to adequately tie state school aid funding levels to student needs and district funding capacity.

The report debunks several of the myths surrounding the educational funding reform movement. In contrast to what some may say – that only … (read more)

Is Governor Pataki really using the Standard & Poor’s study as the basis for his proposed Sound Basic Education Plan?

May 2004.

In presenting his “5-Year Sound Basic Education Financing Plan,” Governor Pataki claimed that it was based on the Standard and Poor’s estimate of the Resource Gap between current school district education spending and the projected amount needed to attain the Regents’ Education Standards. This is one of the four educational standards for which Standard and Poor’s attempted to estimate the resource gap for the state as a whole and for selected districts.

The Governor claimed that the Resource … (read more)

The Southern Tier and School Finance Reform

April 1, 2004. The 68 school districts in the 9-county Binghamton-Ithaca-Elmira-Corning area are among the state’s neediest. The overwhelming majority of would benefit from reforming New York state”s school funding system. Brief >>(read more)

Schools, Taxes and the New York Economy

April 24, 2003. A balanced budget alternative to the Governor’s school aid cuts. Based on an economic impact analysis prepared for FPI by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, this report, released jointly by FPI and the Alliance for Quality Education, shows that the Governor’s school aid cuts are “job killers” in the short run and even worse for the state’s economy over time.  The economic benefits of restoring the Governor’s school aid cuts far outweigh the effects … (read more)

The State of Our Schools Part 2: The Combined Effect of the “Bare Bones” Budget and the Governor’s Proposed State Aid Freeze

April 17, 2002. FPI’s analysis of the combined effect of the 2001-2002 “Bare Bones” Budget and the Governor’s proposed 2002-2003 state aid freeze on New York State school districts and students was presented in a new report from the Alliance for Quality Education and the Public Policy and Education Fund. This analysis shows that under the Governor’s proposed budget, 6 out of 7 school children in the state are in school districts that will receive less aid in 2002-2003 … (read more)

The State of Our Schools: The Effect of the “Bare-Bones” Budget on New York School Districts

January 8, 2002. The Fiscal Policy Institute did the data analysis for this new report from the Alliance for Quality Education and the Public Policy and Education Fund. It shows that 81% of New York State’s school children are in school districts that are getting less state aid per pupil this year than last year, when adjusted for inflation.  Also see:  Impact of the 2001-2002 Bare Bones Budget County by County.

Update: April 17, 2002.… (read more)

Impact of the 2001-2002 Bare Bones Budget on School Districts, County by County

August 2001. Click on the county you are interested in to download a PDF file summarizing the impact of the Bare Bones Budget on the school districts in that county.

Counties Albany Allegany Broome Cattaraugus Cayuga Chautauqua Chemung Chenango Clinton Columbia Cortland Delaware Dutchess Erie Essex Franklin Fulton Genesee Greene Hamilton Herkimer Jefferson Lewis Livingston Madison Monroe Montgomery Nassau Niagara Oneida Onondaga Ontario Orange Orleans Oswego Otsego Putnam Rensselaer Rockland St. Lawrence Saratoga Schenectady Schoharie Schuyler Seneca Steuben Suffolk Sullivan(read more)

School Finance Reform Victory

January 10, 2001. Today, the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, a coalition of parent organizations, community school boards, concerned citizens and advocacy groups won a major victory at the State Supreme Court in their challenge to the way in which New York State funds elementary and secondary education.  In his 180-page decision, Justice Leland DeGrasse gave the New York State legislature until September 15, 2001, to draw up a new funding system that meets the following five requirements:

  1. Ensuring that
(read more)

An Agenda for a Better New York: Funding a Sound Basic Education for All New York’s Children

January 1999. New from the Fiscal Policy Institute: this report sets forth and analyzed a plan for reforming New York State’s system of financing its schools that covers the aid formula part of Justice’s DeGrasse’s requirements.  This plan was developed by FPI in an attempt to “operationalize” the Campaign for Fiscal Equity’s “Statewide Fair Funding Principles for a Sound Basic Education.” David Gaskell, Frank Mauro, Jennifer McCormick and Trudi Renwick wrote the report.… (read more)