Immigration

FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative examines the role of immigrants in the New York State economy and beyond. The initiative is guided by an expert advisory panel and is directed by David Dyssegaard Kallick, FPI Senior Fellow.

Immigrant Small Business Owners: A Significant and Growing Part of the Economy

June 14, 2012. More than one in six small business owners in the United States is an immigrant, according to a new report from FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative. Immigrants – people born in another country – make up 18 percent of all small business owners in the United States. By contrast, immigrants are 13 percent of the population and 16 percent of the labor force, according to the American Community Survey from 2010. That’s a big change from 20 years … (read more)

Testimony on the importance of libraries to integrating immigrants

April 16, 2012. Before a New York City Council hearing about the impact of Mayor Bloomberg’s proposed budget cuts to libraries, FPI’s David Dyssegaard Kallick stressed the important role libraries play in helping to integrate immigrants into the social and economic fabric of New York City. Testimony (read more)

The New York State DREAM Act: A preliminary estimate of costs and benefits

March 9, 2012. The New York State DREAM Act would open the state’s Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) to all students who meet the funding criteria, irrespective of their immigration status. What would be the costs and benefits of this proposal? This brief is the latest release from FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative.… (read more)

Testimony on “DREAM Act” Legislation

December 9, 2011. FPI’s David Dyssegaard Kallick was invited to deliver testimony before a joint hearing convened by the New York State Assembly Standing Committee on Governmental Operations and Standing Committee on Higher Education. He testified that going to college allows immigrants – even undocumented immigrants – to improve their employment opportunities, thereby boosting their contribution to the economy and to tax revenues. “Their success is also our success,” Kallick noted.… (read more)

New Americans on Long Island: A Vital Sixth of the Economy

October 27, 2011. Immigrants – documented and undocumented combined – make up 16 percent of the population of Long Island, and account for 17 percent of total economic output. This report presents data on jobs, earnings, family income, taxes, and home ownership. Immigrants’ economic role is examined town by town and in a national context as well. Among the 50 most affluent suburban counties in the country, Nassau and Suffolk are neither at the top nor the bottom of any … (read more)

Immigrants Make up Half of All Small Business Owners in NYC

October 3, 2011. New numbers from FPI’s Immigration Research Institute show that immigrants make up almost half of all small business owners in New York City. And, immigrants in the labor force are somewhat more likely than U.S.-born workers to own small businesses. Immigrant small business owners are an extremely diverse group, with no single country of origin dominating; in fact, the top ten groups together still make up just 45 percent of the total number of immigrant small business … (read more)

Brooklyn Labor Market Review – Spring 2011

June 22, 2011. Prepared by FPI  for the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, the latest issue of the BLMR looks at immigrant entrepreneurs in Brooklyn by sector. The report finds that there are nearly 14,500 Brooklyn immigrant small businesses across a range of sectors from construction to restaurants, grocery stores, child care services and doctors’ offices. … (read more)

Immigration’s Impacts on the Long Island Economy

December 1, 2010. A report by David Dyssegaard Kallick published in the Regional Labor Review, vol. 13, no. 1 (Fall 2010), published by the Center for the Study of Labor and Democracy at Hofstra University. Read the report.(read more)

The Changing Profile of Long Island’s Economy: How U.S.-born workers have fared as immigration has grown

November 17, 2010. This report shows the big overall immigrant contribution to Long Island’s economy, stressing the diversity of immigrant jobs, but also looking at whether immigrants are displacing U.S.-born workers or lowering wages. For nearly all Long Island residents the answer is no. However, there is reason for concern about African American men with a high school diploma or less. They seem to be losing ground (higher unemployment rates) as immigrant share of the labor force increases. This issue … (read more)

New York City Immigrants in the Great Recession

August 2, 2010. How are immigrants faring in the economic downturn? Data released by FPI shows that immigrants, who make up nearly half of the New York City labor force, have an unemployment rate that is slightly lower than for U.S.-born workers. First, immigration is sensitive to labor market demand, so when there are fewer jobs, immigration slows. Second, lacking a safety net, immigrants are more likely to work at whatever jobs they can get. U.S.-born workers may have the … (read more)