Immigration

FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative examines the role of immigrants in the New York State economy and beyond. The initiative is guided by an expert advisory panel and is directed by David Dyssegaard Kallick, FPI Senior Fellow.

New Americans on Long Island: A Vital Sixth of the Economy

October 27, 2011. Immigrants – documented and undocumented combined – make up 16 percent of the population of Long Island, and account for 17 percent of total economic output. This report presents data on jobs, earnings, family income, taxes, and home ownership. Immigrants’ economic role is examined town by town and in a national context as well. Among the 50 most affluent suburban counties in the country, Nassau and Suffolk are neither at the top nor the bottom of any … (read more)

Immigrants Make up Half of All Small Business Owners in NYC

October 3, 2011. New numbers from FPI’s Immigration Research Institute show that immigrants make up almost half of all small business owners in New York City. And, immigrants in the labor force are somewhat more likely than U.S.-born workers to own small businesses. Immigrant small business owners are an extremely diverse group, with no single country of origin dominating; in fact, the top ten groups together still make up just 45 percent of the total number of immigrant small business … (read more)

Brooklyn Labor Market Review – Spring 2011

June 22, 2011. Prepared by FPI  for the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, the latest issue of the BLMR looks at immigrant entrepreneurs in Brooklyn by sector. The report finds that there are nearly 14,500 Brooklyn immigrant small businesses across a range of sectors from construction to restaurants, grocery stores, child care services and doctors’ offices. … (read more)

Immigration’s Impacts on the Long Island Economy

December 1, 2010. A report by David Dyssegaard Kallick published in the Regional Labor Review, vol. 13, no. 1 (Fall 2010), published by the Center for the Study of Labor and Democracy at Hofstra University. Read the report.(read more)

The Changing Profile of Long Island’s Economy: How U.S.-born workers have fared as immigration has grown

November 17, 2010. This report shows the big overall immigrant contribution to Long Island’s economy, stressing the diversity of immigrant jobs, but also looking at whether immigrants are displacing U.S.-born workers or lowering wages. For nearly all Long Island residents the answer is no. However, there is reason for concern about African American men with a high school diploma or less. They seem to be losing ground (higher unemployment rates) as immigrant share of the labor force increases. This issue … (read more)

New York City Immigrants in the Great Recession

August 2, 2010. How are immigrants faring in the economic downturn? Data released by FPI shows that immigrants, who make up nearly half of the New York City labor force, have an unemployment rate that is slightly lower than for U.S.-born workers. First, immigration is sensitive to labor market demand, so when there are fewer jobs, immigration slows. Second, lacking a safety net, immigrants are more likely to work at whatever jobs they can get. U.S.-born workers may have the … (read more)

Testimony by David Dyssegaard Kallick: The relationship between immigration and economic growth

June 30, 2010. Senior fellow David Dyssegaard Kallick testified at a public hearing held by the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform to hear ideas from members of the public. He testified about the relationship between immigration and economic growth and about the importance of federal support for state and local governments. Read the testimony.… (read more)

Immigrants in Work Force: Study Belies Image

April 15, 2010. Today’s New York Times featured an article by Julia Preston based on FPI data together with related materials  – data and interviews.

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Across the Spectrum: The Wide Range of Jobs Immigrants Do

April 15, 2010. Immigrants are by no means all low-wage workers in the 25 largest metropolitan areas, as this new report shows. In many metro areas, there are more higher-skilled immigrants than there are lower-skilled. Surprisingly, these are not the metro areas with the most economic growth; rather, they are areas with low overall immigration, including Pittsburgh, Detroit, and St. Louis.

This is a companion report to Immigrants and the Economy, published November 2009.… (read more)

Immigrants in New York City: Economic Profile by Country of Origin

January 21, 2010. Data citywide as well as specific to countries of origin (in order of population impact): Dominican Republic, Mexico, India, China, Jamaica, Ecuador, Colombia, Guyana and British Guiana, Philippines, Haiti, El Salvador, Korea, Trinidad and Tobago, Poland, Peru, Italy, Russia and other USSR, Ukraine, Pakistan, Cuba, Bangladesh, and Hong Kong.… (read more)