New York State and its major regions

FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative examines the role of immigrants in the New York State economy and beyond. The initiative is guided by an expert advisory panel and is directed by David Dyssegaard Kallick, FPI Senior Fellow.

New Wave of Refugee Research: An Emerging Consensus

July 30, 2018. For many decades, refugees were not at the center of attention in immigration debates. Refugee resettlement was viewed as a duty to the United States that we handled quietly and with pride. There were debates about how to handle border enforcement, interior enforcement, visas for farm workers, visas for high-skilled workers, and of course constant wrestling about a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Refugee resettlement, never a big share of overall immigration, was seen as a … (read more)

New York State Economic and Fiscal Outlook FY 2019

February 15, 2018. In its 28th annual New York State budget briefing book, the Fiscal Policy Institute analyzes and comments on Governor Andrew Cuomo’s FY 2019 Executive Budget.

The Trump Administration’s tax law, looming federal budget cuts, multi-billion-dollar state budget deficits, glaring unmet human and physical infrastructure needs throughout the state…this year’s New York State budget negotiations are taking shape against a worrisome and uncertain backdrop. The president and congress are threatening to dismantle decades-old federal entitlement programs, make … (read more)

Continuing New York’s Legacy of Providing Health Care Coverage to Immigrants

February 9, 2018. New York State has a long and proud history of trailblazing innovative policies that expand access to healthcare coverage to all its residents. From developing and establishing the nation’s first comprehensive health insurance program for children to the launch of the New York State of Health Marketplace under the Affordable Care Act, New York has often been a national leader in expanding access to quality affordable health coverage.

In the midst of federal attacks against immigrants, Governor … (read more)

Termination of TPS Hurts Families and The Economy

Termination of TPS Hurts Families and The Economy 26,000 At Risk in New York

On January 8, 2018, the Trump administration announced that it would be terminating Temporary Protective Status (TPS) for individuals from El Salvador, and that these recipients have until September 9 to obtain another legal status or return to their country of birth. This follows a chain of terminations of other TPS statuses including Haiti, Sudan, and Nicaragua, while Honduras’s status is still under … (read more)

Immigrants in the 13th Congressional District

January 18, 2018. In the current political context, a number of members of congress are thinking about immigration even more than they usually do. To inform the discussion, FPI occasionally provides information about the residents of different congressional districts. Here is a little bit of background on the 13th Congressional District located in New York City, which includes upper Manhattan and a part of the Bronx.

There are 3.1 million immigrants living in New York City, and 280,000 in … (read more)

The Dream Act Would Boost New York’s Economy

The Dream Act Would Boost New York’s Economy

December 20, 2017. On September 5, 2017, the Trump administration announced that it would revoke the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This program provided immigrant youth who are currently undocumented and arrived in the United States before the age of 16, work authorization, protection from deportation and the sense of security of being able to live a life like everyone else in the place they call home.

It only took a … (read more)

Dream Act Would Boost NY Economy and Tax Revenues: Revoking DACA Hurts Both

Dream Act Would Boost NY Economy and Tax Revenues Revoking DACA Hurts Both

 

The Dream Act would allow immigrants in New York to contribute more fully to the state economy, boosting longterm state’s $1.5 trillion GDP by at least $1.8 billion a year, and increasing state and local tax revenues in New York by $62 million, according to a report released today by the Fiscal Policy Institute that draws on analyses from the Center for American Progress and … (read more)

David Dyssegaard Kallick Participates in the “On Immigration” Panel Discussion

November 20, 2017. On November 1, 2017, FPI’s Deputy Director and Director of the Immigration Research Initiative, David Dyssegaard Kallick, joined other experts in a panel discussion, “The Business of Immigration,” hosted by City & State New York. He joined the moderator Stuart Schulman, Professor of Management at Baruch College Zicklin School of Business, Lorelei Salas, Commissioner for the Department of Consumer Affairs, Hollis V. Pfitsch, Deputy Commissioner at the Law Enforcement Bureau, and Dara Adams, Industry Program Director at … (read more)

David Dyssegaard Kallick Participates in Newsmakers Panel on Stakes for New Yorkers in the 2017 City Elections

September 13, 2017. On September 8, there was a panel that discussed the 2017 mayoral and City Council election that was organized by the Center for Community and Ethnic Media at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. FPI’s David Dyssegaard Kallick, Deputy Director and Director of Immigration Research, joined the host Errol Louis, Professor Christina Greer from Fordham University, Christian González-Rivera from the Center for an Urban Future, and Stephen Witt from Kings County Politics to discuss health and immigration … (read more)

The Workers That Feed Our Families: Fighting for the Right to Organize

August 2, 2017.

The Workers That Feed Our Families: Fighting for the Right to Organize

Crispin Hernandez is a farmworker who felt he and others he worked with were not getting a fair wage or decent working conditions. The solution, he thought, was to organize with other workers to be able to negotiate with their employers. When he started organizing, however, he was fired.

The New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), who is representing Crispin Hernandez, filed a lawsuit against … (read more)