National

FPI’s Immigration Research Initiative examines the role of immigrants in the New York State economy and beyond. The initiative is guided by an expert advisory panel and is directed by David Dyssegaard Kallick, FPI Senior Fellow.

Squeezing Refugees: Numbers for 2018 by State and Metro Area

November 2, 2018. Earlier this year, the Pew Research Center published a report showing that refugee resettlement was scaled back in the United States more dramatically in the United States than in any other country.

In 2018, however, the refugee resettlement numbers have dropped even more dramatically.

With data through the end of October already available, we can calculate pretty reasonably what the full year will look by extrapolating from the first 10 months of the year. For comparison, below … (read more)

FPI Estimates Human & Economic Impacts of Public Charge Rule: 24 Million Would Experience Chilling Effects

October 10, 2018. Today, the Trump Administration published its proposed reinterpretation of a previously arcane rule, known as “public charge.” The new interpretation would radically restrict access to green cards and various types of visas for immigrants who do not have a high enough income, or who have used public health, food, or housing supports they are otherwise qualified to receive. Without input from Congress, the Trump Rule would fundamentally change this country’s approach to immigration, making income and use … (read more)

Event: David Dyssegaard Kallick Will Present in “The Immigration and Deportation Crisis” at Hofstra University

Join FPI and others for a discussion on the devastating implications of the termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, the reduction to the U.S. refugee cap and of immigrant arrests, deportations and family separations. FPI’s Deputy Director and Director of Immigration Research, David Dyssegaard Kallick will join other presenters including Emily Ngara, from the Deportation Defense Clinic Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University, and Saul Guerrero, from the United Food and Commerical Workers … (read more)

Anchor Institutions: Refugee Resettlement Agencies

September 11, 2018. The Trump administration’s decision to decrease the number of refugees admitted and in general slow down the refugee resettlement process means that only a trickle of refugees are coming into the United States. As FPI noted in our recent reporton refugee employment, the United States is on track to resettle just 20,000 refugees in 2018, down from 97,000 in 2016.

This is a tragedy for refugees, who languish in resettlement camps or live in horrific danger. … (read more)

New Wave of Refugee Research: An Emerging Consensus

July 30, 2018. For many decades, refugees were not at the center of attention in immigration debates. Refugee resettlement was viewed as a duty to the United States that we handled quietly and with pride. There were debates about how to handle border enforcement, interior enforcement, visas for farm workers, visas for high-skilled workers, and of course constant wrestling about a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Refugee resettlement, never a big share of overall immigration, was seen as a … (read more)

New York State Economic and Fiscal Outlook FY 2019

February 15, 2018. In its 28th annual New York State budget briefing book, the Fiscal Policy Institute analyzes and comments on Governor Andrew Cuomo’s FY 2019 Executive Budget.

The Trump Administration’s tax law, looming federal budget cuts, multi-billion-dollar state budget deficits, glaring unmet human and physical infrastructure needs throughout the state…this year’s New York State budget negotiations are taking shape against a worrisome and uncertain backdrop. The president and congress are threatening to dismantle decades-old federal entitlement programs, make … (read more)

Making Facts Matter: Immigration Messaging Webinar

February 1, 2018. A webinar on how to understand and talk with audiences about the economics of immigration, featuring:

David Dyssegaard Kallick, Fiscal Policy Institute

Marisa Gerstein Pineau, FrameWorks Institute

Andrew Lim, New American Economy

Linda Fleener, Illinois Immigrant Business Coalition

Denzil Mohammed, The Immigrant Learning Center Public Education Institute

Sponsored by the Immigrant Learning Center and the Public Education Institute.

The FPI powerpoint used for the discussion is available by clicking here. The best way to view it is … (read more)

Immigrants Are Part of Our Economic Growth

Blame Congress, Not Immigrants, If America’s Taxes Don’t Pay for Our Expenses

December 25, 2018. Recently, WhiteHouse.gov put up a post on its web site claiming that immigration results in “$300 billion annually in net fiscal costs on U.S. taxpayers.”

As I said in talking with PolitiFact, this is just sophistry. The United States has been running a deficit for years. So, by definition, all Americans have a bigger net cost than contribution – 1st generation immigrants, 2nd generation … (read more)

New Data from FPI: Refugee Placement by Metro Area and Locality

November 6, 2017.

Until recently, refugee resettlement was something the United States took on quietly and with a justified sense of pride. Even as immigration policy became a controversial issue, refugee resettlement was generally kept out of the fray.

More recently, refugee resettlement has become a focus of uneasy attention. With the refugee ban that was implemented by the Trump administration in the beginning of his term and the decision to cut resettlement numbers in half, it is more important … (read more)

Continuation of Protection for Some Immigrants is Good News for NY Economy

Young Immigrants Pay $55 Million More in NY Taxes as a Result of DACA

July 5, 2017. In the midst of a flurry of restrictive actions against various categories of immigrants, the Trump administration announced last month that it would continue, at least for now, the policy that protects some undocumented immigrants from deportation if they arrived in the United States as children. The policy, known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, allows immigrant youth who register and … (read more)