Great Recession and aftermath

The Taxpayer Costs of Low-Wage Fast Food Jobs in New York State

October 16, 2013. Fast food jobs are by far the biggest source of job growth in New York State and New York City in this recovery and over the past decade. But, with a median hourly pay of only $8.90 an hour in NYC, this growth in fast food jobs is one of the reasons that poverty has risen sharply during the recovery.

NYC has a record number of working poor—one out of every 10 workers in NYC works,… (read more)

State of Working New York 2013: Workers Are Paying a High Price for Persistent Unemployment

August 28, 2013. New York workers are paying a high price for persistent unemployment four years into the weakest recovery since the Great Depression, according to the Fiscal Policy Institute’s (FPI) 2013 edition of The State of Working New York. The report notes that in addition to lost job opportunities and health benefits, New York workers are suffering from prolonged periods of joblessness, and high rates of underemployment (or “hidden unemployment”), reflecting more discouraged workers who have given up… (read more)

NYC’s Rising Poverty and Falling Incomes Since the Great Recession

September 27, 2012. The latest data from the Census Bureau on poverty and incomes in 2011 clearly show that New York City has a long way to go to make up for the erosion in living standards caused by the Great Recession of 2008-09. Since the start of the recession, 200,000 more city residents have fallen into poverty, bringing the total to 1.7 million out of a population of 8.1 million.  For 2011, the federal poverty threshold for a 3-person… (read more)

State of Working New York 2012: Data Show a Disappointingly Weak Recovery

September 2, 2012. How are New Yorkers faring? Here’s the gist of this year’s annual report from FPI on the New York State economy:

  • Unemployment in New York State has been around eight percent or higher for the past three and a half years, the longest stretch since the mid-1970s. The average duration of unemployment is currently nine months. The historic weakness of the recovery stems from the severity and nature of the Great Recession and financial

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State of Working New York 2011, Part II: Great Recession takes a $31 billion toll on New Yorkers

November 29, 2011. New data show that New York families face smaller incomes, fewer opportunities, more hardship. The Fiscal Policy Institute’s 2011 annual edition of the State of Working New York examines how bad the Great Recession and the not-so-great “recovery” have been for the wages and incomes of typical New Yorkers. Of the 504,000 jobs lost, 80 percent are wage and salary positions, and about 20 percent represent fledgling businesses that haven’t been started because of the difficult economic… (read more)

Can Obama’s Plan Erase New York’s Jobs Deficit?

September 14, 2011. An article by James Parrott, FPI’s deputy director and chief economist, who writes regularly for Gotham Gazette’s Economy section. Article >>

State of Working New York 2011, Part I: One in seven New Yorkers out of work two years into “recovery”

August 31, 2011. FPI’s 2011 annual edition of the State of Working New York documents New York’s continuing unemployment crisis in the context of the weak national economic recovery. Two years into the “recovery” from the Great Recession of 2008-2009, one in seven New York workers is unemployed, under-employed or has given up looking for work – a total of 1.4 million New Yorkers. Long-term unemployment is at record levels. Half of the unemployed have been out of work for… (read more)

Scant recovery for workers in NYC: Young workers see gains, but unemployment worsens for older workers

July 20, 2011. This report, the latest on “The State of Working NYC,” finds several crosscurrents in the first year after the job market bottomed out in NYC. Young workers (ages 16-21 and 22-27) gained in the recovery, contrary to the national trend of decreasing employment rates for these age groups. Unfortunately, older workers too bucked the trend: nationally they made small gains, but in NYC they fared worst of all age groups. While NYC’s job growth outpaced the… (read more)

Budget Cuts Could Strangle Sputtering Recovery

June 20, 2011. An article by James Parrott, FPI’s deputy director and chief economist, who writes regularly for Gotham Gazette’s Economy section.

Briefing on Mayor Bloomberg’s Preliminary FY 2012 New York City Budget

March 2, 2011. Despite Wall Street’s rebound, unemployment and hardship continue; at best, recovery will be very gradual. The revenue rebound does not make up for declining federal and state aid, particularly in education. Human services are being cut, while recent tax changes worsen the regressivity of the City’s tax structure. The City should begin to address several tax inequities and strengthen its revenue base. Briefing >>