Income distribution, inequality and poverty

Pulling Apart: Gap Between New York’s Wealthiest and Poorest is Widest in the Nation

January 26, 2006. New studies find that New York has the most unequal income distribution of the 50 states. And the situation in the Empire State has gotten much worse over the last two decades. This is among the findings of a new report from FPI, Pulling Apart in New York: An Analysis of Income Trends in New York, by the Fiscal Policy Institute. Also see Pulling Apart: A State-by-State Analysis of Income Trends, a new analysis of … (read more)

Little in the Middle

September 4, 2005. An op ed by David Dyssegaard Kallick, New York Times.

ON this Labor Day weekend, here’s something to think about: New York City’s middle class is shrinking. Once a solidly middle-class place, New York has become a city of rich and poor.

What’s going on, in part, is a worrisome shift in the structure of the New York job market. The economic boom of the 1990’s didn’t do much to lift middle-income New Yorkers; people in … (read more)

Low-wage New York workers deserve a raise

November 29, 2004. A letter to the editor by FPI’s senior economist, Trudi Renwick, Albany Times Union.

Your Nov. 12 editorial about the rise of poverty among working families in New York correctly pointed out that one solution to this problem would be an increase in the state’s minimum wage.

In July, both the Senate and Assembly passed a bill to increase the state’s minimum wage.

The bill, which would have established a state minimum wage of $6 per … (read more)

State of Working New York 2004: Recovery Yet to Arrive for Many New York Workers and Their Families

September 6, 2004. The U.S. job market overall is still too weak to broadly distribute the benefits of the growing economy. The slack labor market has led to a situation in which wages have started to fall behind inflation. Press release with New York figures below or link to press release with tables and graphs.

FPI’s State of Working New York series, published biennially since 1999, provides comprehensive and up-to-date analysis of the data available on the conditions … (read more)

Why Did New York Workers Lose Ground in the 1990s?

November 25, 2002. FPI Senior Economist Moshe Adler refutes the assertion that the increase in poverty and the decrease in median family income in New York City during the 1990s were due to immigration.  Regional Labor Review, Fall 2002. Study >> (read more)

Pulling Apart: Poverty, Income Inequality, and Injustice in New York State

September 7, 2002. FPI Senior Economist Trudi Renwick made the keynote address at the Southern Tier Labor-Religion Coalition’s annual Solidarity Supper. Her remarks were based on FPI’s April release, Pulling Apart: New Studies Find Income Inequality in New York Worst of Any State.… (read more)

Learning from the ’90s: How Poor Public Choices Contributed to Income Erosion in New York City

September 1, 2002. This report uses the latest economic and census data to examine the role of immigration, government policies and other factors in explaining why the economic expansion of the 1990s did not raise the income of average workers in New York City. Full report, executive summary, press release.… (read more)

Pulling Apart: New Studies Find Income Inequality in New York Worst of Any State

April 23, 2002. … and getting worse rather than better; New York has the most unequal income distribution of the 50 states and the situation in the Empire State has gotten much worse over the last two decades. This is among the findings of a new analysis of income trends in the 50 states by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Economic Policy Institute, and a companion state-level report by the Fiscal Policy Institute.

(read more)

Despite good economic times of the last several years, 2.5 million New Yorkers continue to live in poverty

September 25, 2001. New York’s official poverty rate fell from 14.1% in 1999 to 13.4% in 2000, but more than 2.5 million New Yorkers continue to have incomes below the official poverty thresholds, according to the new income and poverty statistics released by the U.S. Bureau of the Census this morning. Press release with New York data >>(read more)

State of Working New York 2001: Working Harder, Growing Apart

September 2, 2001. The decade of boom was a bust for most New York workers and their families. Although the state’s economy grew, average New York families’ living standards are lower than in 1989, despite working more hours to make ends meet. Press release below.

(read more)