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Living Standards in New York City: The Foundation of Quality of Life

April 15, 1999. City Project used this brief (available in pdf) for its Alterbudget agenda.

Living Standards in New York City – The Foundation of Quality of Life

Any discussion of quality of life in New York City needs to consider what is happening to living standards. Indeed, a decent income that provides for basic human material needs – shelter, food, medical care, clothing, etc. – should be the starting point for gauging a community’s “quality of life”. In … (read more)

Social Security Keeps More Than 800,000 Elderly New Yorkers Out of Poverty

April 8, 1999. Over 500,000 are women. Press release:

A new analysis by the Washington-D.C. based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities confirms that Social Security is our nation’s most important safety net program. In New York State, for example, over one million elderly would be living in poverty if it were not for Social Security. This essential social insurance program lifts a over 800,000 elderly New Yorkers out of poverty. Social Security is particularly important to the economic well-being … (read more)

Text of March 16,1999 letter from Nancy L. Johnson sent individually to all 50 governors

March 16, 1999

The Honorable John G. Rowland Governor of Connecticut 210 Capitol Avenue Hartford, CT 06106

Dear John:

Most states have not been spending all the federal dollars that have been allocated to them under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant. According to our budget analysts, states have about $6 billion in unspent funds left over from fiscal years 1997 and 1998. My colleagues and I on the Committee on Ways and Means are fighting to … (read more)

H.R.1060: The Distorting Subsidies Limitation Act

March 10, 1999. This legislation, introduced in the U. S. House of Representatives by Congressman David Minge, is based on a plan developed by officials of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minnesota. The legislation is intended to reduce the pressure that states and cities currently face to participate in the “Economic War Among the States” by having the federal government tax away the benefits that corporations receive in the form of state and local government subsidies.

Main Sponsor: U. S. … (read more)

Working but Poor in New York

March 8, 1999. This report from the Fiscal Policy Institute (revised in July 1999) outlines why and how to improve the economic situation of a hard-working but ignored population. Report below; also see press release.

Working but Poor in New York

Table of Contents

  1. Dedication
  2. Acknowledgements
  3. Executive Summary
  4. Working but Poor in New York
    1. Many New Yorkers Work but Remain Poor
    2. New York’s Poverty Rate Has Remained High While the National Rate Has Dropped Steadily
    3. Most Poor Families Include a
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Report Shows That More Than One Million New Yorkers Are Poor Despite Work

March 8, 1999. Highlights of a report released today are given in this press release:

According to a new report issued today by the Fiscal Policy Institute, New York State’s economy is not working for low-income working families. The new study, Working but Poor in New York: Improving the Economic Situation of a Hard-Working but Ignored Population, found that more than one million New Yorkers live below the poverty level despite the fact that they are members of households with … (read more)

Personal Income Tax Changes in New York State: Enacted 1995 Cuts and Proposed 2003 Cuts

February 1999. An analysis by Michael Ettlinger of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, presented at FPI’s budget briefing in Albany.… (read more)

A Blind Eye: Assessing New York’s 1999-2000 Executive Budget in Economic, Social and Fiscal Context

February 1999. The Fiscal Policy Institute’s annual budget briefing. Below, text from the briefing book on the 1999-2000 executive budget. Also see Personal Income Tax Changes in New York State: Enacted 1995 Cuts and Proposed 2003 Cuts, which was presented at the briefing in Albany by Michael Ettlinger of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

  • The 1999-2000 Executive Budget turns a blind eye to the major challenges and opportunities facing New York State, failing to even recognize them
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Providing Paid Family Leave Through the Temporary Disability Insurance Program: An Attractive and Affordable Option

January 1999. A brief by Carolyn Boldiston.

Over the last twenty-five years, the numbers of people that work and also care for children and parents have increased dramatically. To respond to this situation, Congress passed the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in 1993 which finally required employers to provide leave to care for one’s own serious health condition, including pregnancy, and to care for a new child or a seriously ill child, spouse or parent.

While the FMLA protects … (read more)

An Agenda for a Better New York: Funding a Sound Basic Education for All New York’s Children

January 1999. New from the Fiscal Policy Institute: this report sets forth and analyzed a plan for reforming New York State’s system of financing its schools that covers the aid formula part of Justice’s DeGrasse’s requirements.  This plan was developed by FPI in an attempt to “operationalize” the Campaign for Fiscal Equity’s “Statewide Fair Funding Principles for a Sound Basic Education.” David Gaskell, Frank Mauro, Jennifer McCormick and Trudi Renwick wrote the report.… (read more)