Tax & Budget

The Impact of New York State’s Personal Income Tax on Low Income Working Families

March 1, 2001. This report shows that New York has among the lowest income tax burdens in the country for low-income working families. Most of the relief for these families comes from the State Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) enacted in 1994. The income tax rate cuts and other changes enacted in 1995 now cost over $5 billion per year but provide very little help to these families. Also see the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities annual report, State (read more)

Poverty Amidst Plenty 2001

February 27, 2001. New York State leaves millions of dollars unspent for anti-poverty efforts for state’s poor families. The state’s TANF funds should be fully and promptly used for the New York families that need them. A new report makes the case.

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Balancing Revenues, Expenditures and Human Needs in the 21st Century: Assessing New York’s 2001-2002 Executive Budget in Economic, Social and Fiscal Context

January 2001. The Fiscal Policy Institute’s 11th annual budget briefing.  Briefing book on the 2001-2002 executive budget >>

Also at this year’s briefing, Michael Mazerov of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities made a presentation: The “Single Sales Factor” Formula for State Corporate Taxes: A Boon to New York Economic Development or a Costly Giveaway?(read more)

Are Lazio’s proposed tax cuts good for New York?

October 29, 2000. Point-counterpoint opinion from FPI’s Frank Mauro and Stephen Kagann, New York State Chief Economist, in the New York Daily News.

It’s a Boon to the Rich By Frank Mauro, Executive Director, Fiscal Policy Institute

Rick Lazio likes to refer to his proposed tax cuts as balanced and fiscally responsible, and says they will “extend economic expansion across New York.” In reality, he fails on all three grounds.

The Lazio tax cuts are not fiscally responsible. Together … (read more)

The Impact of Federal Spending Priorities on New York State: An Educational Briefing

June 2, 2000. New York State receives $3.9 billion less per year from the federal government in key budget areas than it did in 1980. Meanwhile, while military spending grew by $10.7 billion. Representatives of Statewide Youth Advocacy, the Interfaith Alliance of New York State and the Fiscal Policy Institute joined Greg Speeter and Pam Schwartz of the National Priorities Project in presenting an educational briefing today on how federal spending priorities impact New Yorkers. Press release:

A new report, … (read more)