Press releases

Hardships: The Real Story of Working Families

July 24, 2001. A new national study confirms that New York families need incomes well above “poverty level” to make ends meet. Fully 37.5% of New York families with young children do not earn enough to afford basic necessities. In a press release (below), FPI compares the results of a new national study by Economic Policy Institute, Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families, to The Self Sufficiency Standard for New York released last fall.

Also see … (read more)

Briefing: The Empire State Jobs Program

May 15, 2001. The Fiscal Policy Institute joined the other members of the Campaign for the Empire State Jobs Program to organize a briefing on the program for state officials. The Empire State Jobs program is a transitional employment program that would provide work experience, training and other needed support services to public assistance recipients with serious barriers to employment and little or no paid work experience, particularly those who are close to reaching the five-year time limit on family … (read more)

A Preliminary Analysis of the Impact of President George W. Bush’s Tax Cut Proposals on New York State

April 12, 2001. A new administration in Washington is determined to push through an unprecedented $1.6 trillion tax cut that will have far-reaching effects for years to come. This report shows that the Bush tax plan would hit the Empire State with a powerful “double whammy.” While the richest 1.1% would receive over 60 percent of the tax cut, 2.5 million New Yorkers would be left entirely. Many other New Yorkers would receive cuts that are smaller than advertised. Overall, … (read more)

Poverty Amidst Plenty 2001

February 27, 2001. New York State leaves millions of dollars unspent for anti-poverty efforts for state’s poor families. The state’s TANF funds should be fully and promptly used for the New York families that need them. A new report makes the case.

(read more)

Minimum wage hike would boost workers left behind by the economic expansion

February 7, 2001. Minimum wage hike would boost workers left behind by the economic expansion. The current proposal to increase the Federal minimum wage by $1.50 in 3 steps between now and 2003 would directly benefit more than 520,000 New York workers. Press release >>(read more)

Social Security Protects 253,000 New Yorkers Under Age 40

September 27, 2000. Despite widespread public perception that Social Security is only for seniors, 253,000 young people in New York receive monthly benefits through the Social Security disability and survivors insurance programs. A new report, Young Social Security Beneficiaries in New York, discusses the impact that Social Security privatization would have on this vulnerable population. Press release below.

Social Security, America’s Most Important Safety Net Program, Protects 253,000 New Yorkers Under Age 40

These and other recipients of Disability … (read more)

The Self Sufficiency Standard for New York: How Much Do New Yorkers Really Need to Make Ends Meet?

September 13, 2000. Today, the members of the New York State Self-Sufficiency Standard Steering Committee released the Self Sufficiency Standard for New York report in Albany. The report is authored by Dr. Diana Pearce who currently teaches at the School of Social Work at the University of Washington, Seattle. Dr. Pearce has developed these Standards for 12 other states.

Full report here, county-by county standards here. Executive summary, press release and committee members below. Also see the article … (read more)

Family Self Sufficiency Standard: Steering Committee

Informational Meetings on: The Self-Sufficiency Standard for New York

How much do New Yorkers need to earn to meet all their basic needs? How can subsidies help?

The Self-Sufficiency Standard for New York is the thirteenth state in a series of such standards, developed by Dr. Diana Pearce. The Self-Sufficiency Standard shows how much is enough for families to meet their basic needs. It covers costs for housing, child care, food, transportation, medical care, miscellaneous expenses, and taxes. It also … (read more)