Reports, briefs and presentations

Keeping DREAMers Out of College: Missouri Makes a Costly Mistake

April 19, 2016. Missouri’s appropriations bill for higher education includes instructions that would leave immigrants who have been granted deferred action in the position of having to pay a much higher tuition rate at state colleges. For every student this discourages from going to community college, the student loses $7,000 in potential earnings and the state and local governments lose $630 in potential tax contributions. For those who don’t get a bachelor’s degree, it costs the typical student $21,000 per … (read more)

Upstate-Downstate Wage Differentials are Relatively Small in Low-Wage Occupations

March 24, 2016. For the bulk of low-wage occupations most likely to be affected by a higher minimum wage, wage levels are fairly uniform between upstate and downstate. Phasing in the minimum wage increase over 6 years to 2021 for the upstate areas as opposed to 3 years for downstate provides ample time for upstate businesses whose wage levels generally are 5% to 10% lower than downstate to adjust to the higher wage floor. See the complete brief for further … (read more)

$15 Minimum Wage Would Raise Earnings for 1.1 Million Immigrants

March 23, 2016. In a brief, the Fiscal Policy Institute states that gradually raising the New York State minimum wage from its current level of $9/hour to $15/hour by 2019 in New York City and mid-2021 in the rest of the state would give a much-needed raise to 1.1 million immigrant workers.

In all, there are 3.2 million New York workers who will benefit from the phased-in wage increase, which would on average increase wages by $4,900 per year. These … (read more)

The Retail Sector—New York’s Biggest Low-wage Employer Needs to Provide Higher Wages

March 22, 2016. Among all sectors, retail trade has the most low-wage workers in New York State. Over a half million (555,200) retail workers will benefit from an increase in the statewide minimum wage to $15 an hour. These workers make up nearly a fifth (18 percent) of the 3.2 million workers receiving a wage boost, although retail jobs represent one in nine of all New York jobs.

With the phased-in $15 minimum wage floor, 61 percent of all women … (read more)

Proposed EITC Expansion Is No Substitute for Proposed $15 Minimum Wage

March 18, 2016. The state’s EITC is an extremely important benefit to low- and moderate-income working families. There is considerable merit to Assemblyman Kolb’s proposed 50% enhancement to the state’s EITC, raising it form 30% to 45% of the federal EITC. However, the proposal is certainly not a substitute for raising the minimum wage. It is more appropriate to view the EITC and raising the minimum wage as complementary policies. See the complete brief issued jointly by the Fiscal Policy … (read more)

Briefing on Mayor deBlasio’s Preliminary FY 2017 NYC Budget: Budgeting Cautiously amid State and Economic Uncertainty

March 10, 2016. In his briefing of NYC Mayor Bill deBlasio’s FY 2017 Preliminary budget, FPI’s James Parrott highlights the following:

  1. Strong economic and tax growth used to further a different set of budget and policy priorities than predecessors: reinvesting in human services; committing new resources to address housing and homelessness; continuing and different investments in public safety; and changing employment and wage policies to aid workers.
  1. Cautious budgeting in the face of economic uncertainty: Outyear gaps have been reduced;
(read more)

Tax Breaks for Wealthy Contributors to Private or Public Schools?

March 2, 2016. The education tax credit proposals currently being discussed have significant drawbacks as outlined in FPI’s new brief.

Both the governor’s proposal and the senate’s represent misguided tax policy for a number of reasons:

  • The PCEA represents a radical and unwise departure from existing state tax policy because it provides an unprecedented proportion (75 or 90 percent) of tax reduction relative to a contribution. It has the potential to lessen charitable contributions for a wide range of
(read more)

Full Implementation of Obama’s Immigration Executive Actions Would Bring $82 Million in Tax Revenues to New York

February 24, 2016. A 50-state study released today by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, co-released in New York by the Fiscal Policy Institute, finds that if President Obama’s executive actions on immigration were permitted to be fully implemented they would bring an additional $82 million in New York state and local tax revenue compared to not having the actions in place.

The executive actions would add to the tax revenue in all 50 states and in the District … (read more)

Figures from New York State Economic and Fiscal Outlook 2016-2017

All the figures listed below are in JPEG format. The briefing book page number on which each figure appears is included below.

NYS FY 2017 Revenues – Page 4

NYS FY 2017 Expenditures – Page 5

Fig 1. Local Assistance and Support to State Agencies Keeps Falling Because of Governor’s 2% Spending Cap – Page 10

Fig 2. NY’s Economic Ability to Pay Well Exceeds the Governor’s 2% State Spending Limit – Page 11

Fig 3. Characteristics of NYS Workers (read more)

New York State Economic and Fiscal Outlook FY 2017

February 3, 2016. In its 26th annual New York State budget briefing book, the Fiscal Policy Institute analyzes and comments on Governor Andrew Cuomo’s FY 2017 Executive Budget.

The Executive Budget advances some bold and progressive proposals that well reflect the values and needs of New Yorkers. In particular, the governor has shown great leadership and vision in forcefully advocating for a first-in-the nation statewide $15 minimum wage. If enacted, the minimum wage increase would lift the incomes of … (read more)