2014

New York City Social Services Workforce

April 3, 2014. In doing research and analysis of the New York City social services workforce, a preliminary chart pack was assembled that includes:

  1. NYC Contract Budget for Social Services
  2. Demographics of Private Social Service Workforce
  3. NYC Social Services Sector: Annual Earnings by Occupation
  4. Social Services Wages & Hours
  5. Social Services Workers: Family Income Relative to Poverty Status
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Comparison of Final 2014-2015 NYS Revenue Bill to earlier Executive, Assembly and Senate Budget Proposals

March 31, 2014. This brief compares the New York State Revenue Bill to earlier Executive, Assembly, and Senate tax proposals.… (read more)

Testimony: NYC School Bus Industry in the Aftermath of the Removal of Employee Protection Provisions from Contracts

March 27, 2014. James Parrott testified at a New York City Council oversight hearing looking at the effects of removing job security protections from the City school bus contracts. The previous administration set in motion a contract re-bidding process that stripped school bus drivers, matrons and mechanics of job security protections. That action has already led to the bankruptcy of a large school bus company in the middle of the school year and threatens to further unsettle the industry on … (read more)

Tax Foundation: 2014 State Business Climate Rankings

March 26, 2014. This brief puts the Tax Foundation’s 2014 State Business Climate rankings into perspective and shows why attempting to improve New York’s ranking will have very little impact on economic growth or job creation.… (read more)

2014-2015 New York State Budget Tax Brief

March 24, 2014. The 2014-2015 New York State Budget Tax Brief compares the tax proposals in the Assembly and Senate budget resolutions with those in the Executive Budget. The major proposals are analyzed and their impacts discussed.… (read more)

Briefing on Mayor deBlasio’s Preliminary FY 2015 NYC Budget: Initial Progressive Steps, More to Come

March 11, 2014. In his review of NYC Mayor Bill deBlasio’s first budget, FPI’s James Parrott notes the new mayor’s progressive change in direction compared to prior City budgets. Not surprisingly, the major new initiative included in the Preliminary FY 2015 budget is full funding for the UPK/afterschool proposal scheduled for launch in the fall of 2014.

The briefing summarizes trends in state and federal aid, and analyzes projections for tax revenue growth. Parrott describes the municipal labor contract situation … (read more)

Testimony Presented to the New York City Council Committee on Civil Service and Labor

February 27, 2014. In testimony presented before the New York City Council Civil Service and Labor Committee, FPI’s James Parrott summarized several employment, wage and cost of living trends affecting low-wage workers in New York City. He noted that 37 percent of all wage-earners in the city are paid less than $15 an hour, and that half of all black and Latino workers are low-wage by this measure. Parrott discussed several groups of low-wage workers and suggested policy steps the … (read more)

New report confirms New York’s profound income polarization

February 19, 2014. A new report from the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) that presents data on income distribution trends for all 50 states from 1917-2011, confirms an analysis of income trends in New York that the Fiscal Policy Institute initially published in 2010. The report, by economists Estelle Sommeiller and Mark Price, builds on a groundbreaking study by economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanual Saez in 2003 that used data from income tax returns to document rising inequality in … (read more)

Events Honoring Frank J. Mauro

Two events were held honoring the contributions of Frank J. Mauro, Executive Director Emeritus: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 in Albany and Thursday, May 1, 2014 in New York City.… (read more)

Why New York State Should Let Cities and Counties Enact Higher Local Minimum Wages

February 14, 2014. While New York’s economy is gradually recovering, far too many workers still earn very low wages. Pay for the typical New Yorker has not kept up with inflation, and the majority of new jobs being created in New York and nationally are in low paying fields. As communities in New York struggle with these serious economic challenges, other states have empowered localities to respond by adopting higher local minimum wages. From California to Maryland, growing numbers of … (read more)