Year

Report: Public Charge Rule Change Will Have ‘Chilling Effect’ On Immigrant Community

October 12, 2018. This report discusses the findings of FPI’s new report, “Only Wealthy Immigrants Need Apply,” that include an estimated 24 million people will be affected by the “public charge” rule. The author goes on to highlight the finding that 9 million children will be affected, most of them U.S. citizens.

FPI’s report says the new interpretation would “radically restrict access to green cards and various types of visas for immigrants who do not have a high enough income, … (read more)

The Trump Administration’s Proposed Public Charge Rule Is The Next Step in An Ongoing Immigration Crackdown

October 11, 2018. This article discusses the federal administration’s proposed “public charge” rule that could affect 24 million people. The author notes that the rule would directly affect immigrants seeking permanent status but that there would be “chilling effects” that spread fear among immigrants to disenroll or not apply for public benefits. The article goes on to highlight important facts about the “public charge” rule which include that it will not affect refugees, asylees  protected groups, or green card holders, … (read more)

FPI Estimates Human & Economic Impacts of Public Charge Rule: 24 Million Would Experience Chilling Effects

October 10, 2018. Today, the Trump Administration published its proposed reinterpretation of a previously arcane rule, known as “public charge.” The new interpretation would radically restrict access to green cards and various types of visas for immigrants who do not have a high enough income, or who have used public health, food, or housing supports they are otherwise qualified to receive. Without input from Congress, the Trump Rule would fundamentally change this country’s approach to immigration, making income and use … (read more)

Panel Sparks Conversation on Immigration in the United States

October 3, 2018. FPI’s Deputy Director and Director of Immigration Research, David Dyssegaard Kallick, joined Emily Ngara of Hofstra’s Maurice A. Deane School of Law and Saul Guerrera of United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, at Hofstra University on September 26, in a panel to discuss immigration challenges. The topics discussed included Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), family separations, deportations, labor trends, obstacles for obtaining citizenship, refugees and asylees.

Emily Ngara, the attorney-in-charge of the Deportation Defense Clinic … (read more)

Event: David Dyssegaard Kallick Will Present in “The Immigration and Deportation Crisis” at Hofstra University

Join FPI and others for a discussion on the devastating implications of the termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, the reduction to the U.S. refugee cap and of immigrant arrests, deportations and family separations. FPI’s Deputy Director and Director of Immigration Research, David Dyssegaard Kallick will join other presenters including Emily Ngara, from the Deportation Defense Clinic Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University, and Saul Guerrero, from the United Food and Commerical Workers … (read more)

Anchor Institutions: Refugee Resettlement Agencies

September 11, 2018. The Trump administration’s decision to decrease the number of refugees admitted and in general slow down the refugee resettlement process means that only a trickle of refugees are coming into the United States. As FPI noted in our recent reporton refugee employment, the United States is on track to resettle just 20,000 refugees in 2018, down from 97,000 in 2016.

This is a tragedy for refugees, who languish in resettlement camps or live in horrific danger. … (read more)

For TMCO, Refugees Are Key to Diverse and Welcoming Workplace

September 4, 2018. TMCO, a company located in Lincoln, Nebraska, strives to create a diverse workplace that includes refugees. They provide English language courses for the workers, help schedule doctor appointments, provide a family-first mentality and organize potluck dinners for all the employees. Chris Decker, professor and chair of the Department of Economics at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, discusses the importance of refugees in Lincoln. He notes that minorities are the reason for the population growth over the … (read more)

Anti-Immigration Group FAIR Achieves New Political Clout in Trump’s America- Despite Being Labeled A Hate Group

August 30, 2018. The anti-immigration Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) which advocates for the elimination of all illegal immigration, cuts to legal immigration and not providing amnesty for children born in the U.S. of undocumented immigrants, is stepping into mainstream America, and moving away from the margins where it has previously been. Although this organization has been labeled a hate group, it has seen increased support and social media presence, and the recruitment of its previous leaders to the … (read more)

New York’s Economic Spending Shortchanges Nonwhite Communities, Report Says

August 2, 2018. This article discusses a new report written by The Fiscal Policy Institute and Make the Road New York which shows that areas with a higher concentration of people of color across New York State are awarded less than their fair share of economic development funds. Additionally this study found that white males are massively overrepresented on the Regional Economic Development Councils which allocate these funds.

“The regional council competition is one of the largest sources of economic … (read more)

New Wave of Refugee Research: An Emerging Consensus

July 30, 2018. For many decades, refugees were not at the center of attention in immigration debates. Refugee resettlement was viewed as a duty to the United States that we handled quietly and with pride. There were debates about how to handle border enforcement, interior enforcement, visas for farm workers, visas for high-skilled workers, and of course constant wrestling about a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Refugee resettlement, never a big share of overall immigration, was seen as a … (read more)