Year

A Blind Eye: Assessing New York’s 1999-2000 Executive Budget in Economic, Social and Fiscal Context

February 1999. The Fiscal Policy Institute’s annual budget briefing. Below, text from the briefing book on the 1999-2000 executive budget. Also see Personal Income Tax Changes in New York State: Enacted 1995 Cuts and Proposed 2003 Cuts, which was presented at the briefing in Albany by Michael Ettlinger of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

  • The 1999-2000 Executive Budget turns a blind eye to the major challenges and opportunities facing New York State, failing to even recognize them
(read more)

Providing Paid Family Leave Through the Temporary Disability Insurance Program: An Attractive and Affordable Option

January 1999. A brief by Carolyn Boldiston.

Over the last twenty-five years, the numbers of people that work and also care for children and parents have increased dramatically. To respond to this situation, Congress passed the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in 1993 which finally required employers to provide leave to care for one’s own serious health condition, including pregnancy, and to care for a new child or a seriously ill child, spouse or parent.

While the FMLA protects … (read more)

An Agenda for a Better New York: Funding a Sound Basic Education for All New York’s Children

January 1999. New from the Fiscal Policy Institute: this report sets forth and analyzed a plan for reforming New York State’s system of financing its schools that covers the aid formula part of Justice’s DeGrasse’s requirements.  This plan was developed by FPI in an attempt to “operationalize” the Campaign for Fiscal Equity’s “Statewide Fair Funding Principles for a Sound Basic Education.” David Gaskell, Frank Mauro, Jennifer McCormick and Trudi Renwick wrote the report.… (read more)

Estimating Cost of Using New York’s Temporary Disability Insurance Program to Provide Partial Pay to Covered Workers During Leaves Taken Under the FMLA

December 1998. Technical analysis by Carolyn Boldiston.… (read more)

Practical Action is Necessary to Ensure that People Doing Necessary Jobs Receive a Living Wage

December 8, 1998. New from the Fiscal Policy Institute:

The Fiscal Policy Institute today joined with two national organizations, Jobs with Justice and the National Priorities Project, and state and local organizations throughout the country, in recommending four practical strategies for closing the gap between CEO and worker pay. These groups also highlighted several ways in which federal and state government can assist working families in making ends meet and moving up the economic ladder.

To underscore the need for … (read more)

The Children’s Budget Report

November 1998.  A detailed analysis of spending on low-income children’s programs in 13 states by Deborah A. Ellwood of FPI and Kimura Flores and Toby Douglas of the the Urban Institute.… (read more)

Is state death tax too high? No, gov exaggerates its impact

July 13, 1998. By Frank J. Mauro, New York Daily News. One of a pair of point-counterpoint op eds; with ‘pro’ side by Governor George E. Pataki.… (read more)

Minimum Wage Hikes Boosted Earnings Without Job Loss: Low-income Families Reap Benefits as Intended

May 18, 1998. New from the Fiscal Policy Institute:

Press release

“The minimum wage increases that took effect in 1996 and 1997 did exactly what they were supposed to do: More than a half million New York workers got a raise, with most of the benefits going to low-income families,” said Frank Mauro, executive director of the Fiscal Policy Institute (FPI), a progressive think tank based in Latham, NY, that is supported by labor unions, foundations, religious organizations and a … (read more)

A taxing question: Free lunch or fair deal?

March 29, 1998. Counterpoint: “Only businesses would benefit from the changes,” by Frank J. Mauro, Times Union. One of a pair of op eds, with the opposite point of view taken by Daniel B. Walsh of the Business Council.… (read more)

Corporate Tax Policy and the Right to Know: Improving State Tax Policymaking by Enhancing Legislative and Public Access

December 1993. A report prepared for the Fiscal Policy Institute by Richard D. Pomp, the Alva P. Loiselle Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut’s School of Law and the former Executive Director of New York State’s Legislative Tax Study Commission.… (read more)