Archive – 2002 Publications

[already item] December 3, 2002: Tale of Two Recessions: The Current Slowdown in New York City Compared to the Early 1990s by James Parrott and Oliver Cooke. (PDF)

[already item] November 25, 2002: Briefing materials on the NYS and NYC budgets:

[already item] November 25, 2002: Why Did New York Workers Lose Ground in the 1990s? FPI Senior Economist Moshe Adler refutes the assertion that the increase in poverty and the decrease in median family income in New York City during the 1990s were due to immigration.  Research Report published in the Regional Labor Review, Fall 2002. (PDF)

[already item] October 30, 2002: An Assessment of the Monroe County Department of Social Services and Health Department Altreya Consulting LLC Assessment and Recommendations Updated Report. FPI Senior Economist Trudi Renwick critiques the statistical analyses on which  Altreya Consulting LLC based its assessment of the Monroe County Department of Social Services. (PDF)

[already item] October 25, 2002: An Overview of Living Wage Ordinance Initiatives. PowerPoint presentation given by FPI Senior Economist Trudi Renwick at the forum, A Living Wage?   Perspectives on the effect of minimum wage increases on community economic development sponsored by Dutchess County Outreach, the Eleanor Roosevelt Center at Val-kill, and Vassar College.

[already item] September 20, 2002: New York Workers Lost $10.78 Billion in Retirement Assets Due to Stock Market Decline. A new report from the Institute for America’s Future estimates that workers and retirees in New York lost $10.78 billion in 401(k) assets in 2001.  This report also assesses recent congressional action on retirement security issues. Click here for FPI’s press release on this report.

[already item] September 19, 2002:  The Building Service Industry and Displaced Building Service Workers. An analysis of the building service industry in NYC and the impact on taxapayers and the low and moderate wage labor markets of worker displacement in this important local industry.   Presented by FPI Deputy Director and Chief Economist James Parrott to the NYC City Council’s Contracts Committee.

[already item] September 18, 2002: Fiscal Policy Note$: Keeping Mass Transit on Track.   This issue brief reviews the importance of an effectively functioning mass transit system to the effective functioning of the New York City metropolitan area’s economy, and the importance of restoring NYS and NYC financial support for the MTA to earlier levels.

[already item] September 7, 2002: Pulling Apart: Poverty, Income Inequality, and Injustice in New York State. FPI Senior Economist Trudi Renwick’s keynote address at the Southern Tier Labor-Religion Coalition‘s annual Solidarity Supper.

[already item] September 1, 2002: New York and the National Economy provides the latest data on how New York state’s workers and their families are faring during the current recession. It also examines the progress made during the period of economic expansion that New York enjoyed before the current recession hit our state at the beginning of 2001; compares New York’s situation with other states and with the nation as a whole; and, examines variations within New York State.

[already item] September 1, 2002: Learning from the ’90s: How Poor Public Choices Contributed to Income Erosion in New York City uses the latest economic and census data to examine the role of immigration, government policies and other factors in explaining why the economic expansion of the 1990s did not raise the income of average workers in New York City. Also available are:

[already item] August 26, 2002: Sectoral Approaches to Economic Development Research in New York City: Key Themes and Issues.   This report was prepared by FPI staff on the basis of the discussions that occurred at the June 25, 2002, roundtable discussion on sectoral research hosted by the Fiscal Policy Institute, the Consortium for Worker Education and the CUNY Graduate Center.

[already item] August 19, 2002: Labor Market Trends and issues in the Mew York City Non-Profit Social Services Sector. Advance copy, for review and comment, of a special report prepared by the Fiscal Policy Institute for the Institute for Business Trends Analysis of the Borough of Manhattan Community College, and the Consortium for Worker Education. Please direct questions, comments and suggestions to Sarah Crean at 212-414-9001 x223 or by e-mail at screan@fiscalpolicy.org.

[already item] July 29, 2002: Labor Market Trends and Issues in the New York City Securities Industry. Advance copy, for review and comment, of a special report prepared by the Fiscal Policy Institute for the Institute for Business Trends Analysis of the Borough of Manhattan Community College, and the Consortium for Worker Education. Please direct questions, comments and suggestions to Matthew Mitchell at 212-414-9001 x229 or by e-mail at mmitchell@fiscalpolicy.org.

[already item] July 26, 2002: The Use of Partial (Rather than “Full Family”) Sanctions Has Not Led To Smaller Family Assistance Caseload Declines in New York and California. In a report published jointly by the Fiscal Policy Institute and the California Budget Project, David Carroll and Trudi Renwick debunk the claim  that California and New York’s cash assistance caseloads would have dropped more quickly if these states had adopted  so-called “full family” sanctions, a policy under which TANF family assistance benefits are withdrawn from all members of a needy family including children if an adult in that family misses an appointment or fails to comply with some other program requirement. This report shows that California and New York have not experienced substantially smaller declines in their welfare caseloads than the nation as a whole and that economic and policy factors unrelated to sanctions play an important role in explaining this small difference.

[already item] July 20, 2002: Prior to opening of “Listening to the City II,” the Labor Community Advocacy Network (LCAN) to Rebuild New York and Jobs with Justice unveiled a scorecard comparing the concerns expressed at February’s “Listening to the City I” with the actions that have been taken by the relevant public authorities since that event.  LCAN was convened by the the Fiscal Policy Institute and the New York City Central Labor Council of the AFL-CIO in response to the September 11 terrorist attacks.  To learn more about LCAN, contact David Dyssegaard Kallick at 212-414-9001 x224 or go to www.lcan.org.

[already item] July 18, 2002: Entry-Level Jobs in the New York City Information Technology Labor Market.  A Fiscal Policy Institute Labor Market Profile.

[already item] July 18, 2002: Administrative Support and Clerical Occupations in the New York City Corporate Services Sector: Trends and Issues.  A Fiscal Policy Institute Labor Market Profile.

[already item] July 17, 2002: New York City: The Economic and Fiscal Aftershocks of September 11th.   A powerpoint presentation by James Parrott reviewing FPI’s analysis of the impacts of the World Trade Center disaster and how that analysis has been used by FPI and by other organizations, both public and private.

[already item] June 26,2002:  Minimum Wage Update. The purchasing power of the curent $5.15 per hour minimum wage is well below that of the 1960s and 1970s.  From its peak in 1968, the purchasing power of the minimum wage has declined over 36%.

[already item] June 25, 2002: Sectoral Approaches to Economic Development Research in New York City.  Over 50 researchers and economic development practitioners participated in a conference on sectoral research hosted by the Fiscal Policy Institute, the Consortium for Worker Education and the CUNY Graduate Center. Available materials include:

  • conference agenda,
  • participants list,
  • [already item] NYC Sectoral Research Bibliography prepared by FPI staff.   Contains citations to 59 studies in 12 sectors including Health Care, Apparel Manufacturing, and Tourism,
  • [already item] August 26, 2002 report on Key Themes and Issues in economic development sectoral research in New York City. This report was prepared by FPI staff on the basis of the discussions that occurred at the June 25, 2002 conference.

[already item] June 25, 2002: Sector-Based Strategies for Economic Development. Testimony presented to the New York City Council’s Economic Development Committee by James Parrott, FPI’s Deputy Director and Chief Economist.

[already item] June 17, 2002:  Escalating Prescription Drug Costs – The Reality and Options for Reform. FPI Testimony to the New York State AFL-CIO Task Force on Prescription Drugs.

[already item] June 5, 2002: Immigrant Workers Displaced by the September 11th World Trade Center Attacks.

[already item] June 4, 2002: Health Care Industry Trends and Issues.  A Fiscal Policy Institute Labor Market Profile.

[already item] April 24, 2002: Since October 2001, a broad based Labor Community Advocacy Network (LCAN) to Rebuild New York, convened and coordinated by the the Fiscal Policy Institute and the New York City Central Labor Council of the AFL-CIO, has been meeting regularly to hammer out a thoughtful and detailed program for the reconstruction of New York City in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks.  On April 24, the Network released its initial policy statement on the rebuilding of New York City. To read more about the Labor Community Advocacy Network or to access copies of its policy statement in either HTML or MS Word, go to www.lcan.org or click below to access PDF versions of the entire 46 page policy statement, or an 8 page executive summary.

[already item] April 23, 2002.  New Studies Find Income Inequality in New York Worst of Any State … and Getting Worse Rather Than Better. New York has the most unequal income distribution of the 50 states and the situation in the Empire State has gotten much worse over the last two decades. This is among the findings of a new analysis of income trends in the 50 states by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Economic Policy Institute, two highly respected research organizations based in Washington, D.C, and a companion state-level report by the Fiscal Policy Institute.  Go to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities’ website for the national report, Pulling Apart: A State-by-State Analysis of Income Trends and related materials. And, click on the titles below for FPI’s analysis of the situation in New York State:

[already item] March 8, 2002: The Employment Impact of the September 11 World Trade Center Attacks: Updated Estimates based on the Benchmarked Employment Data.

[already item] April 17, 2002: FPI’s analysis of the Combined Effect of the 2001-2002 “Bare Bones” Budget and the Governor’s Proposed 2002-03 State Aid “Freeze” on New York State school districts and students was presented in a new report from the Alliance for Quality Education, of which FPI is an active member.  This analysis shows that under the Governor’s proposed budget, 6 out of 7 school children in the state are in school districts that will receive less aid in 2002-03 under the Governor’s proposed budget than they received in 2000-01 after adjusting for inflation.  Visit AQE’s website (www.aqeny.org) for the report, press release and tables, including one for each county showing the impact on each school district in the state.

[already item] February 26, 2002:  FPI’s testimony before the Senate Finance and Assembly Ways and Means Committees, Joint Public Hearings on Economic Development/Taxation. (Revised March 2, 2002)

[already item] February 26, 2002. New York’s income tax system continues to be one of the best for low-income working families. Most of the relief for these families comes from the EITC enacted in 1994, while the income tax rate cuts enacted in 1995 cost billions but provide very little help.

[already item] February 25, 2002. “An Exploration of New York City’s Role in Lower Manhattan Redevelopment,” Testimony by James A. Parrott, before the Economic Development Committee and the Select Committee on Lower Manhattan Redevelopment of the City Council of the City of New York.

[already item] February 19, 2002. Testimony of Trudi Renwick in  Proceeding on Motion of the New York State Public Service Commission To Consider Cost Recovery by Verizon and to  Investigate the Future Regulatory Framework, Case 00-C-1945.  (This testimony deals with a proposal to expand the list of programs that can be used to determine telephone lifeline eligibility to include EITC, school lunch and Child Health Plus.)

[already item] February 4, 2002:  FPI’s   testimony before the Senate Finance and Assembly Ways and Means Committees, Joint Public Hearing on the Human Services portion of the 2002-2003 Executive Budget (focuses primarily on the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program).

[already item with two below] January 23, 2002: FPI Budget Report:   Economically Sensible Options for Budget Balancing During a Recession

[already item with one above and one below] January 23, 2002:  FPI Budget Report: New York and the Federal Fisc in the Aftermath of September 11th, The State and Local Impacts of Federal Policy Options

[already item with above two] January 23, 2002: FPI Briefing Book on “Balancing New York State’s 2002-03 Budget: The Economic Context

[already item with three above] January 23, 2002:  Budget Alternatives Press Release: Groups Propose More Balanced and Economically Sensible Approach to Balancing State Budget; Call on Federal Government to Address Revenue Aspects of Governor Pataki’s $54 Billion Plan (including January 24, 2002, Daily Gazette and Times Union articles on the release and the press conference at which it was issued)

[already item – 2001] January 23, 2002: The State of Working New York 2001:  Working Harder, Growing Apart. Updated edition of one of FPI’s signature publications.

[already item – Jan 2] January 8, 2002: “The State of Our Schools: The Effect of the “Bare-Bones” Budget on New York School Districts.” January 8, 2001.  The Fiscal Policy Institute did the data analysis for this report which was published by the Alliance for Quality Education, a broad-based coalition of which FPI is an active member.  This analysis shows that 81% of New York State’s school children are in school districts that are getting less state aid per pupil this year than last year, when adjusted for inflation.  Visit AQE’s website (www.aqeny.org) for the report, press release and tables, or click here for access to a series of PDF files – one for each county in the state summarizing the impact of the Bare Bones Budget on the districts in that county.

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