On Census Preparations, State Lags While City, Advocacy Organizations & Business Community Move Ahead

December 10, 2018. This article discusses the work of advocates, community-based organizations (CBOs) and city officials on early preparation for the 2020 census given the challenges that will have to be faced including the possibility of a citizenship question. These advocates and CBOs are calling on the federal government for funding to help complete early preparation work that includes educating people on the importance of the census, efforts to reach hard-to-count communities and provide resources for census completion. Advocates argue that federal under-funding and the inclusion of a citizenship question would lead to a large under count which would create a false data set that is used to form policies and create budgets.

“It might seem early, but given the challenges that are facing the decennial census in 2020, it’s not early enough,” said Steven Romalewski, director of the mapping service at the Center for Urban Research, CUNY Graduate Center. Advocates, government officials, and members of the business community all agree with that sentiment, that early preparation is essential if New York is to ensure a full accounting of its population in the 2020 Census, wherein the stakes are immense.

Many view 2020 as a particularly challenging year for the Herculean effort of carrying out the census. Besides the usual logistical challenges of reaching hard-to-count communities, 2020 is set to see lower-than-expected funding from the federal government, a shift towards digital methodology, and the inclusion of a citizenship question, though it is the subject of ongoing litigation spearheaded by New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood. All that comes amid a heightened atmosphere of anxiety among minority and immigrant communities who fear the repercussions of being counted by a federal administration overtly hostile to their interests while already being most likely to be undercounted.

To make up for the expected shortfall in enumerators, particularly in undocumented communities, the New York Counts coalition is pushing the state government to ensure adequate funding for counting efforts. A study from the Fiscal Policy Institute, commissioned by the coalition, estimated that need at about $40 million, roughly $2 for each of New York’s 19 million residents. But so far, the state has made no commitment while the city’s $4.3 million is something, but far from adequate. (The city is expected to add more funding in the next fiscal year which begins July 1, 2019.)

Here is the link to the Gotham Gazette.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: