Reports, briefs and presentations

2018 State Budget Briefing in NYC

On Wednesday morning, February 28, 2018, the Fiscal Policy Institute will present its 28th annual budget briefing, co-sponsored by the Community Service Society, 633 Third Avenue – the forum will be held on the 16th floor in the Retro Report conference room. Light refreshments and check-in will begin at 9:00 a.m. Our presentation begins at 9:20 a.m. and ends at 10:30 a.m. We hope that you and/or your colleagues will be able to join us for what we are … (read more)

Preliminary New York State Economic and Fiscal Outlook FY 2019

February 15, 2018. In its 28th annual New York State preliminary budget briefing book, the Fiscal Policy Institute analyzes and comments on Governor Andrew Cuomo’s FY 2019 Executive Budget.

The Trump Administration’s tax law, looming federal budget cuts, multi-billion-dollar state budget deficits, glaring unmet human and physical infrastructure needs throughout the state…this year’s New York State budget negotiations are taking shape against a worrisome and uncertain backdrop. The president and congress are threatening to dismantle decades-old federal entitlement programs, … (read more)

Join us for FPI’s FY 2019 Budget Briefing on February 13th

On Tuesday morning, February 13, 2018, the Fiscal Policy Institute will present its 28th annual budget briefing in Meeting Room 7 of the Empire State Plaza Convention Center. A complimentary breakfast and check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m. Our presentation begins at 9:00 a.m. and ends at 10:15 a.m. We hope that you and/or your colleagues will be able to join us for what we are confident will be a useful and informative session. You can RSVP online here(read more)

Dream Act Would Boost NY Economy and Tax Revenues: Revoking DACA Hurts Both

Dream Act Would Boost NY Economy and Tax Revenues Revoking DACA Hurts Both

 

The Dream Act would allow immigrants in New York to contribute more fully to the state economy, boosting longterm state’s $1.5 trillion GDP by at least $1.8 billion a year, and increasing state and local tax revenues in New York by $62 million, according to a report released today by the Fiscal Policy Institute that draws on analyses from the Center for American Progress and … (read more)

A Constitutional Convention – A Risk NOT Worth Taking

A Constitutional Convention – A Risk NOT Worth Taking

Ron Deutsch, Fiscal Policy Institute

The New York Constitution articulates the legal rights of New Yorkers, and in many vital areas, provides our residents more protections than the U.S. Constitution. A Constitutional Convention is an expensive, complicated and potentially dangerous undertaking that is unnecessary because we already have a more rigorous and more democratic process by which the voters can adopt or reject individual amendments to the State Constitution on their … (read more)

New York’s Public Colleges: An Engine for Economic Mobility

August 23, 2017

Brent Kramer, PhD, Senior Economist

kramer@fiscalpolicy.org

 

Public Colleges Lift Low-Income Students Into the Middle Class Investing in Public Colleges Essential to Boost Economic Mobility

Earning a four-year college degree is now considered essential for achieving a “middle-class” lifestyle, even as many new graduates have trouble landing good, full-time jobs in a weak labor market. Despite the weak labor market, graduates still have better chances of finding good jobs than do their peers without degrees.

The Fiscal … (read more)

Uphill Employment Battle for New York’s Recent College Graduates

Brent Kramer, PhD, Senior Economist

Kramer@fiscalpolicy.org
August 3, 2017

 

ALBANY, New York – In today’s post-Great Recession environment, student loan debt has reached all-time highs, and more young adults are living at home longer, and are unable to purchase homes, cars, and other assets because of persistent unemployment or underemployment. Many young would-be workers are forgoing the job market altogether, and returning to school or taking unpaid internships in hopes of breaking into their respective fields.

Eight years after … (read more)

Immigrant Youth Add $140 Million to NY State Tax Revenues

April 25, 2017. What will happen to immigrant youth who as children were brought to the United States without legal status and were temporarily shielded from deportation by a 2012 executive order known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA? The Trump Administration is projecting very mixed messages about the present and future of these young people.

To help shed some light on how DACA has allowed these young immigrants to contribute to our country and our state, a … (read more)

Report: “Undervalued and Underpaid: How New York State Shortchanges Nonprofit Human Services Providers and Their Workers”

March, 2017. The substantial growth in New York’s nonprofit human services sector has come in response to a host of social, demographic and economic changes. The State and its local governments have turned to nonprofit organizations to provide these critical services; these are public services that serve many populations, including children and those with low incomes striving to enter the middle class. Millions of New Yorkers are directly served, and all New Yorkers reap the benefits of more stable … (read more)

March 2017 NYC Budget Presentation

In his briefing on Mayor deBlasio’s Preliminary FY 2018 NYC Budget, James Parrott highlights the following:

Cautious in face of an uncertain Washington: Federal aid is 1/3 of State budget (which is 18% of City budget); 8-10 % of City budget; 64% of NYCHA budget; and nearly half of the Health and Hospitals budget.

State budget better this year, but still challenges: Governor proposed to extend millionaires tax, but it should be enhanced; threat to CFE-settlement determined school aid; handful … (read more)